Convince Your Readers with Persuasive Copy

There may very well be no more fundamental task for a content provider than to be persuasive with your copy. Sounds simple, right? Just up until you’ve tried it, perhaps. You will discover a reason top copywriters get paid the big bucks. Never fear however. You needn’t break the budget to hire your local Shakespeare just yet. There are some basic components of copy-writing with persuasion which will make a major difference, and best of all, they can be learned!

Convince Your Readers with Persuasive Copy

4 Essential steps to persuasive copy

  1. Be sure it’s scannable – We hear constantly how nobody reads on the web anymore – they scan. It is sadly true, since these are the cards we’ve been dealt, here are some ways to make sure that your copy is read by the scanning surfer intent on leaving your page. Use plenty of white space, bullet points, sub-headlines, bolding and color, and compelling images to reel them in and keep their interest.
  2. Write conversationally – Write like you’re talking with a friend. Nobody wants a lecture. So no matter what the subject, and how technical it can appear, be sure you write as you talk. It truly helps with building the trust you are hoping to build with your reader, particularly if you are hoping to induce them to buy anything eventually.
  3. Structure for your outcome – We all love to be told stories, and you can use this in your favor just about every time. We process information most efficiently when the content is provided in a narrative stream, so don’t be shy about telling your story! Use a beginning, middle and end, lead inexorably to a climax, which would be to get the reader to take whatever action you’re asking.
  4. Ask for what you want! – It’s hard to think that we actually have to say this, but so often copy is lean on the asking side. It’s as though they don’t want to come off as too pushy in actually asking for the sale. The truth is that if you don’t sell the ask with enthusiasm, you’re actually disappointing and possibly confusing the reader. It’s expected, so ask. Never write anything without a strong call to action!